Why the US is going back to the 1980s

The Trump administration is looking to the past for a solution to the opioid crisis.

In a series of executive orders announced on Wednesday, the president ordered a review of the drug laws in the United States to find a way to make prescription opioids more widely available and more accessible.

It’s a bold move to push back against a national epidemic.

But the president said it would take time, and he said the country was in the middle of a “historic opioid crisis.”

“Overdose deaths are at record highs.

More than 25,000 Americans died of opioid overdoses last year,” he said in his announcement.”

The opioid crisis has become a national emergency, and we must act now.”

The executive orders are a response to a bipartisan proposal by Sens.

Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Tom Udall (D) that would make it easier for people with chronic pain to access prescription opioids without the threat of criminal prosecution.

The legislation was introduced by Booker and Udall earlier this year, but it hasn’t gained traction since.

It was one of the most difficult issues to tackle, with some senators saying the idea of making opioids available to those who need them without a prescription would be a dangerous idea.

Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) and Sen. Kamala Harris (D.

Calif.) both introduced legislation earlier this month that would legalize the production, distribution, and use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

The opioid epidemic has made the opioid epidemic one of Trump’s biggest campaign promises.

The administration’s plan is to take the lead on this issue, and it’s unclear how much progress it might make.

But it’s clear that the administration is taking a hard look at how to tackle the opioid issue in a way that will have a positive impact on the nation.

We are not a country that can afford to go backwards, and so we’re going to get back to that,” Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) said at a press conference on Wednesday.

We’ve seen a lot of talk of the opioid situation.

And we’re not going to let the president of the United Kingdom have a country where people die in cars and pedestrians, where they’re being killed in front of our house, because he wants to make it harder for us to get clean drugs.

The president said the United State is not alone in the crisis.

The Trump administration’s opioid czar, Michael Botticelli, said that while opioid abuse and addiction has become an epidemic, the opioid addiction crisis is “a crisis in America. “

We’ve had a crisis of overdoses in the States, and now we have a crisis in the world,” he added.

The Trump administration’s opioid czar, Michael Botticelli, said that while opioid abuse and addiction has become an epidemic, the opioid addiction crisis is “a crisis in America.

It’s a crisis that we have to solve, and that is the only way we’re ever going to have any hope for a better tomorrow.”

The opioid prescription crisis is particularly dangerous for the children of opioid addicts, he said.

The problem of opioid addiction affects young people disproportionately.

It disproportionately affects minority communities, the elderly, and children, he added, adding that these children are especially at risk for the epidemic.